WSU Library System News

News & Updates in the Libraries

Archive for February, 2014

Amazing librarians tattoos from around the world

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

There are plenty of literary tattoos out there, and plenty of tattooed librarians. A bit less common are librarians with tattoos celebrating their career choice. Have a look at some of the tattoos that these librarians have chosen to represent their love of literature and libraries:

http://mentalfloss.com/article/12483/11-amazing-librarian-tattoos

The WRT Zone in the UGL is open to students that need help with writing, research or technology

Friday, February 7th, 2014

The doors to the Warrior Writing, Research and Technology Zone, known as the WRT (pronounced “write”) Zone, the new Writing Center and Student Technology Studio (STS) collaborative space, opened last fall, creating a one-stop shop for Wayne State students to get research, writing and technology assistance. Located on the second floor of the David Adamany Undergraduate Library, the new space integrates the current services of both areas and adds a new research assistance component.

Through the combined help of librarians, academic staff and graduate student assistants, the new space offers a myriad of services. The writing and research specialists offer assistance in drafting, revision and documentation as well as aid in finding books, articles and resources, evaluating resources, avoiding plagiarism and much more. The technology side of the collaboration helps in formatting papers and dissertations, assists in creating e-portfolios, video editing, building presentations and the creation and editing of graphics using modern equipment and specialized software. For a full list of services offered, visit: wrtzone.wayne.edu

UGL hosts remarkable traveling exhibit about the war of 1812 through February

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

The Wayne State University Library System is proud to present 1812, a traveling exhibition produced by the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa and arranged through the Consulate General of Canada in Detroit. The exhibit will be on display in the atrium of the David Adamany Undergraduate Library through February 28. 1812 explores the War of 1812 through the perspectives of the four central participants: Canadians (including Canadian First Peoples), Americans, the British, and Native Americans. These multiple perspectives together provide a deeper understanding of the event as a whole.

For Canadians, the War of 1812 was a successful fight for survival against American invasions. For Americans, the war was a successful defense against the British Empire, one that forced Britain to respect American sovereignty and power. For the British, the conflict was a successful but almost irrelevant sideshow, scarcely remembered today, set against the far greater generation-long war against Revolutionary and Napoleonic France. For Native Americans, the war was a desperate fight for freedom and independence as they struggled to defend their homelands, and its conclusion was a catastrophic defeat.

“This exhibition offers a nuanced, thought-provoking portrait of an event that helped shape Canada as a nation,” said Mark O’Neill, President and CEO of the Canadian Museum of Civilization Corporation, which operates the Canadian War Museum.

1812 vividly conveys the motivations and aspirations of the four participants, their experiences of the war, and its effect on their future. It brings to life key personalities, such as Major-General Sir Isaac Brock, who was fatally shot during the Battle of Queenston Heights and became known as “The Hero of Upper Canada”; Francis Scott Key, the Baltimore lawyer who after witnessing the British bombardment of Baltimore, Maryland, wrote the lyrics for what would eventually become the American national anthem; and the Shawnee leader Tecumseh, one of the best-known and most respected Native American military leaders who fought alongside the British and was killed during the battle of the Thames.

The Canadian War Museum is Canada’s national museum of military history. The Consulate General of Canada in Detroit advances Canada’s relationship with the United States in Michigan, Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky.

Come to the Warrior WRT Zone Faculty and GTA Open House March 5

Wednesday, February 5th, 2014

The Warrior WRT Zone supports the writing, research and technology needs of your students with a one stop assistance center located on the 2nd Floor of the UGL. Come to our Open House on Wednesday, March 5 between noon and 4 PM to discover what the Warrior WRT Zone can do to help your students succeed. Giveaways and door prizes!

Through the combined help of librarians, academic staff and graduate student assistants, the WRT Zone offers a myriad of services. The writing and research specialists offer assistance in drafting, revision and documentation as well as help in finding books, articles and resources, evaluating resources, avoiding plagiarism and much more. The technology side of the collaboration aids in formatting papers and dissertations, assists in creating e-portfolios, video editing, building presentations and the creation and editing of graphics using modern equipment and specialized software.

For more information abut the WRT Zone visit wrtzone.wayne.edu

Find, read and monitor thousands of scholarly journals directly from your iPad with the BrowZine app

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014

With the decline of print, databases have become the primary way publishers deliver journals. But databases are designed for searching, not reading. BrowZine works by uniting articles from the Wayne State-owned databases into complete journals, then arranging them by subject on a newsstand. The result is a revolutionary new way to browse, read and monitor scholarly journals and articles.

Learn about BrowZine by first watching this video: http://thirdiron.com/browzine/video/

What is BrowZine?

BrowZine is a content delivery app designed to bring journal articles to your tablet. Currently it is available for iPad (downloadable through the App store) Google Nexus, Kindle Fire HD and Samsung Galaxy devices running OS 4.0+. BrowZine can be downloaded for those devices from Google Play and Amazon. The app is simple to use and brings back the browsability of a journal, which differs greatly from the experience of accessing electronic content from multiple database interfaces.

How do I access journals?

After downloading the app, users have instant access to a free, no-login required open access library. Complete journals and back issues in a variety of disciplines are available. However, since Wayne State subscribes to BrowZine, you can also access all of the Wayne State Libraries’ paid journal subscriptions. Journals can be placed onto a personalized bookshelf for easy access and, in the near future, notification of new available articles.

Can I browse the available journals?

Yes! Faculty members who enjoyed flipping through paper journals can now digitally recreate that experience by quickly scanning issues via a digital table of contents. Frequently read journals can be placed onto a user’s BrowZine bookshelf, where alerts will tell the user when new content has been added. Users can also save articles to a separate BrowZine shelf for offline reading.


Is it easy to read on a tablet?

BrowZine’s high quality PDFs only take moments to load and users can use the familiar pinch to zoom gesture in order to read or examine the paper closely. BrowZine also allows users to send articles to other apps and social media accounts, includings annotation apps like GoodReader, DropBox for cloud storage and citation trackers like Zotero.

How do I get started?

Download the BrowZine app and log in using your access ID and password. From there, start browsing!